When people hear about Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) benefits, their minds often jump to older Americans. However, anyone between the ages of 18 and 64 can apply for SSDI. Although you may fall in the age range for SSDI, your age will be a factor in whether you successfully secure benefits.

It’s presumed younger people still have the ability to work

One of the key components which determines whether an individual is likely to receive SSDI benefits is whether they still have the ability to work. Your disability may make it impossible for you to return to your previous job. However, is there a possibility that you could find a new line of employment?

The Social Security Administration (SSA) will weigh several factors to determine whether you still retain the ability to work in some capacity, including:

  • The extent of your physical or mental disability
  • Level of education
  • Work history
  • Age

Why should age have any bearing on a person’s ability to work? The fact is, it’s difficult for older individuals to find gainful employment. Ageism, although illegal, can play a major role. Sometimes, it’s simply more difficult for older people to pick up new skills.

The SSA is not blind to these facts. In general, if you are under 50, the SSA does not consider age to be much of a factor when looking for new employment. The older you are, the more heavily the SSA will weigh age as a factor when determining whether you have the ability to return to work.

Age is only one factor

If you are under 50, you shouldn’t be discouraged from seeking SSDI benefits. Age is one factor, but it’s not the only factor. A skilled legal professional can help guide you through the claims process and help determine the strongest possible way to present your case.